10 ATAR Facts That Every Student Should Know

Do you understand how the ATAR system works? In this article, we answer your 10 burning questions about the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank.

Faith Woon
Education Analyst

10 ATAR Facts That Every Student Should Know

Do you understand how the ATAR system works? In this article, we answer your 10 burning questions about the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank.

Faith Woon
Education Analyst

What is an ATAR score?

The Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) is a number between 0 and 99.95 given to all Australian students upon graduation from high school.

It's important to note that the ATAR is not a score, but a rank. It serves as a measure of each student's overall academic performance relative to the rest of their cohort.

For Australian universities, the ATAR is the main factor that determines entry into a tertiary course. To find out more about university course entry and ATAR adjustment factors, check out this article.

How are ATARs calculated?

ATARs are calculated on a percentile basis and increase in increments of 0.05. An ATAR of 75.00, for example, indicates that you fall in the top 25 per cent of all students in your cohort. In other words, you scored better than 75 percent of the state.

However, the ‘cohort’ is not defined as the group of students who receive an ATAR in a particular year, but rather the total number of year 12 students who are eligible to receive an ATAR (including students who do not end up with a score). Therefore, while an ATAR of 75 places a student in the 25% of the state, this is not equivalent to being in the top 25% of students who actually received an ATAR.

Although the exact  method by which the ATAR is calculated differs state by state, the basic principle is same:

  • A student receives a raw score for each subject, which is graded on a bell curve against the scores of all other students who took that subject.
  • Each of these raw scores is 'scaled' up or down based on the relative performance of the subject cohort against the general population.
  • An aggregate is calculated by adding up a student's scaled scores (sometimes with different weightings for different subjects).
  • Each student's aggregate is graded on (yet another) bell curve, this time comprising the entire population of students in the state.
  • The ATAR is determined by one's position on this bell curve (presented as a percentile rank).

It's important to note that the ATAR is not a score, but a rank. It serves as a measure of each student's overall academic performance relative to the rest of their cohort.

It's important to note that the ATAR is not a score, but a rank. It serves as a measure of each student's overall academic performance relative to the rest of their cohort.

What is considered a good ATAR?

The definition of a 'good' ATAR will differ greatly from person to person and should be informed by your own personal goals and circumstances. For some, a 99.95 ATAR may be the ultimate end goal, whereas, for others, a reasonable rank to aim for may be the ATAR required to get into a specific university course. It is important to do your research on the admission criteria for various university courses - see more here!

How important is your ATAR?

Ultimately, your ATAR's importance depends on the weight you give to it. You should work hard to achieve the best ATAR you can, but do keep in mind that this single number is not the be-all and end-all. It is simply a way of getting into your desired course and will not define the rest of your life. If you don't end up getting the ATAR you're aiming for, don't stress because there is always more than one pathway to your dream career!

What is the average ATAR?

The average ATAR usually sits at around 70.00. Why is this? Although an ATAR of 70 places a student in the top 70% of year 12 students overall, it only places them in the top 50% of students who get an ATAR (since certain students will not finish their year 12 studies).

6. Is it hard to get an ATAR above 85?

An ATAR of 85.00 means that you are in the top 15% of the state, or around the top 25% of students who receive an ATAR (i.e., the top 25% of ATAR scores). This is an impressive accomplishment, but it is certainly achievable for every student. Especially if you have the right study habits and preparation for your exams.

How many students achieve a 99 ATAR?

The number of students who achieve a 99.00 ATAR differs from year to year, making up the top 1 per cent in every state.

Approximately 500 students will get a 99 ATAR in states like Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland. Approximately 100 students score a 99 every year in Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania, while approximately 40 students achieve this in the ACT.

Do year 11 subjects count towards your ATAR?

No, your ATAR is based entirely upon your performance in your Year 12 studies, unless you decide to take a Year 12 subject early. That said, much of the content you learn in Year 11 serves as 'assumed knowledge' for the following year, so it is still good to be across everything!

Is the ATAR rank equivalent across states?

Yes, ATAR ranks are treated as equivalent across states. This means that Australian universities will treat every ATAR equally, no matter the state in which it was obtained.

For students completing other courses such as the International Baccalaureate, a 'notional ATAR' can be calculated through standard conversion rates. This is also considered equivalent to a standard ATAR.

How can I get a high ATAR?

There are many strategies to achieve a high ATAR. An important one is consistent study, another is school tutoring support with an expert.

We've got you sorted! Follow the link for our tips on how to achieve your dream ATAR. For more advice and information about everything to do with the ATAR system, check out our other posts here.

What is an ATAR score?

The Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) is a number between 0 and 99.95 given to all Australian students upon graduation from high school.

It's important to note that the ATAR is not a score, but a rank. It serves as a measure of each student's overall academic performance relative to the rest of their cohort.

For Australian universities, the ATAR is the main factor that determines entry into a tertiary course. To find out more about university course entry and ATAR adjustment factors, check out this article.

How are ATARs calculated?

ATARs are calculated on a percentile basis and increase in increments of 0.05. An ATAR of 75.00, for example, indicates that you fall in the top 25 per cent of all students in your cohort. In other words, you scored better than 75 percent of the state.

However, the ‘cohort’ is not defined as the group of students who receive an ATAR in a particular year, but rather the total number of year 12 students who are eligible to receive an ATAR (including students who do not end up with a score). Therefore, while an ATAR of 75 places a student in the 25% of the state, this is not equivalent to being in the top 25% of students who actually received an ATAR.

Although the exact  method by which the ATAR is calculated differs state by state, the basic principle is same:

  • A student receives a raw score for each subject, which is graded on a bell curve against the scores of all other students who took that subject.
  • Each of these raw scores is 'scaled' up or down based on the relative performance of the subject cohort against the general population.
  • An aggregate is calculated by adding up a student's scaled scores (sometimes with different weightings for different subjects).
  • Each student's aggregate is graded on (yet another) bell curve, this time comprising the entire population of students in the state.
  • The ATAR is determined by one's position on this bell curve (presented as a percentile rank).

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What is considered a good ATAR?

The definition of a 'good' ATAR will differ greatly from person to person and should be informed by your own personal goals and circumstances. For some, a 99.95 ATAR may be the ultimate end goal, whereas, for others, a reasonable rank to aim for may be the ATAR required to get into a specific university course. It is important to do your research on the admission criteria for various university courses - see more here!

How important is your ATAR?

Ultimately, your ATAR's importance depends on the weight you give to it. You should work hard to achieve the best ATAR you can, but do keep in mind that this single number is not the be-all and end-all. It is simply a way of getting into your desired course and will not define the rest of your life. If you don't end up getting the ATAR you're aiming for, don't stress because there is always more than one pathway to your dream career!

What is the average ATAR?

The average ATAR usually sits at around 70.00. Why is this? Although an ATAR of 70 places a student in the top 70% of year 12 students overall, it only places them in the top 50% of students who get an ATAR (since certain students will not finish their year 12 studies).

It's important to note that the ATAR is not a score, but a rank. It serves as a measure of each student's overall academic performance relative to the rest of their cohort.

It's important to note that the ATAR is not a score, but a rank. It serves as a measure of each student's overall academic performance relative to the rest of their cohort.

6. Is it hard to get an ATAR above 85?

An ATAR of 85.00 means that you are in the top 15% of the state, or around the top 25% of students who receive an ATAR (i.e., the top 25% of ATAR scores). This is an impressive accomplishment, but it is certainly achievable for every student. Especially if you have the right study habits and preparation for your exams.

How many students achieve a 99 ATAR?

The number of students who achieve a 99.00 ATAR differs from year to year, making up the top 1 per cent in every state.

Approximately 500 students will get a 99 ATAR in states like Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland. Approximately 100 students score a 99 every year in Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania, while approximately 40 students achieve this in the ACT.

Do year 11 subjects count towards your ATAR?

No, your ATAR is based entirely upon your performance in your Year 12 studies, unless you decide to take a Year 12 subject early. That said, much of the content you learn in Year 11 serves as 'assumed knowledge' for the following year, so it is still good to be across everything!

Is the ATAR rank equivalent across states?

Yes, ATAR ranks are treated as equivalent across states. This means that Australian universities will treat every ATAR equally, no matter the state in which it was obtained.

For students completing other courses such as the International Baccalaureate, a 'notional ATAR' can be calculated through standard conversion rates. This is also considered equivalent to a standard ATAR.

How can I get a high ATAR?

There are many strategies to achieve a high ATAR. An important one is consistent study, another is school tutoring support with an expert.

We've got you sorted! Follow the link for our tips on how to achieve your dream ATAR. For more advice and information about everything to do with the ATAR system, check out our other posts here.

What is an ATAR score?

The Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) is a number between 0 and 99.95 given to all Australian students upon graduation from high school.

It's important to note that the ATAR is not a score, but a rank. It serves as a measure of each student's overall academic performance relative to the rest of their cohort.

For Australian universities, the ATAR is the main factor that determines entry into a tertiary course. To find out more about university course entry and ATAR adjustment factors, check out this article.

How are ATARs calculated?

ATARs are calculated on a percentile basis and increase in increments of 0.05. An ATAR of 75.00, for example, indicates that you fall in the top 25 per cent of all students in your cohort. In other words, you scored better than 75 percent of the state.

However, the ‘cohort’ is not defined as the group of students who receive an ATAR in a particular year, but rather the total number of year 12 students who are eligible to receive an ATAR (including students who do not end up with a score). Therefore, while an ATAR of 75 places a student in the 25% of the state, this is not equivalent to being in the top 25% of students who actually received an ATAR.

Although the exact  method by which the ATAR is calculated differs state by state, the basic principle is same:

  • A student receives a raw score for each subject, which is graded on a bell curve against the scores of all other students who took that subject.
  • Each of these raw scores is 'scaled' up or down based on the relative performance of the subject cohort against the general population.
  • An aggregate is calculated by adding up a student's scaled scores (sometimes with different weightings for different subjects).
  • Each student's aggregate is graded on (yet another) bell curve, this time comprising the entire population of students in the state.
  • The ATAR is determined by one's position on this bell curve (presented as a percentile rank).

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

It's important to note that the ATAR is not a score, but a rank. It serves as a measure of each student's overall academic performance relative to the rest of their cohort.

What is considered a good ATAR?

The definition of a 'good' ATAR will differ greatly from person to person and should be informed by your own personal goals and circumstances. For some, a 99.95 ATAR may be the ultimate end goal, whereas, for others, a reasonable rank to aim for may be the ATAR required to get into a specific university course. It is important to do your research on the admission criteria for various university courses - see more here!

How important is your ATAR?

Ultimately, your ATAR's importance depends on the weight you give to it. You should work hard to achieve the best ATAR you can, but do keep in mind that this single number is not the be-all and end-all. It is simply a way of getting into your desired course and will not define the rest of your life. If you don't end up getting the ATAR you're aiming for, don't stress because there is always more than one pathway to your dream career!

What is the average ATAR?

The average ATAR usually sits at around 70.00. Why is this? Although an ATAR of 70 places a student in the top 70% of year 12 students overall, it only places them in the top 50% of students who get an ATAR (since certain students will not finish their year 12 studies).

How many students achieve a 99 ATAR?

The number of students who achieve a 99.00 ATAR differs from year to year, making up the top 1 per cent in every state.

Approximately 500 students will get a 99 ATAR in states like Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland. Approximately 100 students score a 99 every year in Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania, while approximately 40 students achieve this in the ACT.

Do year 11 subjects count towards your ATAR?

No, your ATAR is based entirely upon your performance in your Year 12 studies, unless you decide to take a Year 12 subject early. That said, much of the content you learn in Year 11 serves as 'assumed knowledge' for the following year, so it is still good to be across everything!

Is the ATAR rank equivalent across states?

Yes, ATAR ranks are treated as equivalent across states. This means that Australian universities will treat every ATAR equally, no matter the state in which it was obtained.

For students completing other courses such as the International Baccalaureate, a 'notional ATAR' can be calculated through standard conversion rates. This is also considered equivalent to a standard ATAR.

How can I get a high ATAR?

There are many strategies to achieve a high ATAR. An important one is consistent study, another is school tutoring support with an expert.

We've got you sorted! Follow the link for our tips on how to achieve your dream ATAR. For more advice and information about everything to do with the ATAR system, check out our other posts here.

What is an ATAR score?

The Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) is a number between 0 and 99.95 given to all Australian students upon graduation from high school.

It's important to note that the ATAR is not a score, but a rank. It serves as a measure of each student's overall academic performance relative to the rest of their cohort.

For Australian universities, the ATAR is the main factor that determines entry into a tertiary course. To find out more about university course entry and ATAR adjustment factors, check out this article.

How are ATARs calculated?

ATARs are calculated on a percentile basis and increase in increments of 0.05. An ATAR of 75.00, for example, indicates that you fall in the top 25 per cent of all students in your cohort. In other words, you scored better than 75 percent of the state.

However, the ‘cohort’ is not defined as the group of students who receive an ATAR in a particular year, but rather the total number of year 12 students who are eligible to receive an ATAR (including students who do not end up with a score). Therefore, while an ATAR of 75 places a student in the 25% of the state, this is not equivalent to being in the top 25% of students who actually received an ATAR.

Although the exact  method by which the ATAR is calculated differs state by state, the basic principle is same:

  • A student receives a raw score for each subject, which is graded on a bell curve against the scores of all other students who took that subject.
  • Each of these raw scores is 'scaled' up or down based on the relative performance of the subject cohort against the general population.
  • An aggregate is calculated by adding up a student's scaled scores (sometimes with different weightings for different subjects).
  • Each student's aggregate is graded on (yet another) bell curve, this time comprising the entire population of students in the state.
  • The ATAR is determined by one's position on this bell curve (presented as a percentile rank).

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

It's important to note that the ATAR is not a score, but a rank. It serves as a measure of each student's overall academic performance relative to the rest of their cohort.

What is considered a good ATAR?

The definition of a 'good' ATAR will differ greatly from person to person and should be informed by your own personal goals and circumstances. For some, a 99.95 ATAR may be the ultimate end goal, whereas, for others, a reasonable rank to aim for may be the ATAR required to get into a specific university course. It is important to do your research on the admission criteria for various university courses - see more here!

How important is your ATAR?

Ultimately, your ATAR's importance depends on the weight you give to it. You should work hard to achieve the best ATAR you can, but do keep in mind that this single number is not the be-all and end-all. It is simply a way of getting into your desired course and will not define the rest of your life. If you don't end up getting the ATAR you're aiming for, don't stress because there is always more than one pathway to your dream career!

What is the average ATAR?

The average ATAR usually sits at around 70.00. Why is this? Although an ATAR of 70 places a student in the top 70% of year 12 students overall, it only places them in the top 50% of students who get an ATAR (since certain students will not finish their year 12 studies).

How many students achieve a 99 ATAR?

The number of students who achieve a 99.00 ATAR differs from year to year, making up the top 1 per cent in every state.

Approximately 500 students will get a 99 ATAR in states like Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland. Approximately 100 students score a 99 every year in Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania, while approximately 40 students achieve this in the ACT.

Do year 11 subjects count towards your ATAR?

No, your ATAR is based entirely upon your performance in your Year 12 studies, unless you decide to take a Year 12 subject early. That said, much of the content you learn in Year 11 serves as 'assumed knowledge' for the following year, so it is still good to be across everything!

Is the ATAR rank equivalent across states?

Yes, ATAR ranks are treated as equivalent across states. This means that Australian universities will treat every ATAR equally, no matter the state in which it was obtained.

For students completing other courses such as the International Baccalaureate, a 'notional ATAR' can be calculated through standard conversion rates. This is also considered equivalent to a standard ATAR.

How can I get a high ATAR?

There are many strategies to achieve a high ATAR. An important one is consistent study, another is school tutoring support with an expert.

We've got you sorted! Follow the link for our tips on how to achieve your dream ATAR. For more advice and information about everything to do with the ATAR system, check out our other posts here.

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