3 Unique Strategies To Help Your Kids With Maths Homework

Worried about helping your child with their homework? Read about 3 unique strategies that you can use to help your kids with their math homework.

Joey Moshinsky
Co-Founder of Tutero

As a parent, you want to support your child through their education. You want to provide that shoulder to lean on and that extra pair of hands for homework tasks.

But for so many parents, there comes a tipping point when their child’s homework becomes too hard to handle… especially with maths! So, what can you do when this issue arises?

Here are three tips that do not involve pulling out a textbook for some late-night study.

For many students, the time investment required to find suitable online resources is a large enough barrier to prevent them from benefitting. This is where you come in.

For many students, the time investment required to find suitable online resources is a large enough barrier to prevent them from benefitting. This is where you come in.

Help find online resources

Although quadratics isn’t your forte, online research seems to be (evidenced by the fact that you found this article).

Luckily for you (and your child), we live in an age where an incredible array of resources to assist your child with their learning can be easily accessed online. For many students, the time investment required to find suitable online resources is a large enough barrier to prevent them from benefitting. This is where you come in.

If you are able to distil this search to resources specific to a particular skill or question type, you will be able to source fantastic materials to support their learning. You will be amazed by the results that a search of “quadratic equations using the split method” can yield.

Another tip: for each topic or concept, search for various resources of different types that can be used to support your child’s learning in different ways. For example, first seek out a written explanation, followed by a YouTube video and a practice worksheet.

Contextualise the learning

Bodies of academic research have found that when a student understands why they are learning new information, they see a noticeable uplift in motivation and knowledge retention.

As a parent who understands the broader benefits of education and the potential applications of new knowledge, it can be your role to communicate this why. There are two different approaches we recommend to help achieve this contextualisation:

1. Explain the opportunities that certain knowledge can unlock

Explain to your child the profound influence that the knowledge of a particular subject can have in their lives, whether they want to be an astronaut (do that maths homework!), a sports commentator (pay attention in English class!) or find the cure for cancer (listen to the chemistry teacher!).

2. Find applications of the specific knowledge being learnt (this may involve independent research)

Almost everything that your child learns at school has a real-world context, even if at first it is hard to determine (looking at you, algebra!). Once your child can relate their subject-matter to a real-world situation, the perceived benefits of learning become more tangible, and increases in motivation will naturally follow.

Break down misunderstanding into modular blocks

There are very few things that are more counterproductive for students’ knowledge development than becoming overwhelmed by the amount of information they are required to learn.

If you start to sense that your child is feeling overrun by their misunderstanding, and is disconnecting from their homework as a result, this is an important moment during which to intervene as a parent.

Why? Because your external perspective can help you break down what might appear to be an overwhelming task into smaller, more manageable, content blocks. Do not let your child conclude that they “can’t do calculus”; instead, explain to them that they are simply missing a discrete set of skills.

These missing skills can then be addressed one-by-one inform an ordered learning program to build capability in an optimal fashion.

If your child is struggling with their maths homework, this may be a result of gaps in their foundational knowledge.

Consider exploring the Tutero Maths learning platform to see if our intelligent diagnostic-based learning programs can help them find and fill their knowledge gaps in maths.

Thanks for reading! Check out some of our other blog posts for more tips on how to help your child learn.

As a parent, you want to support your child through their education. You want to provide that shoulder to lean on and that extra pair of hands for homework tasks.

But for so many parents, there comes a tipping point when their child’s homework becomes too hard to handle… especially with maths! So, what can you do when this issue arises?

Here are three tips that do not involve pulling out a textbook for some late-night study.

FAQ

What age groups are covered by online maths tutoring?
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Online maths tutoring at Tutero is catering to students of all year levels. We offer programs tailored to the unique learning curves of each age group.

Are there specific programs for students preparing for particular exams like NAPLAN or ATAR?
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We also have expert NAPLAN and ATAR subject tutors, ensuring students are well-equipped for these pivotal assessments.

How often should my child have tutoring sessions to see significant improvement?
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We recommend at least two to three session per week for consistent progress. However, this can vary based on your child's needs and goals.

What safety measures are in place to ensure online tutoring sessions are secure and protected?
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Our platform uses advanced security protocols to ensure the safety and privacy of all our online sessions.

Can I sit in on the tutoring sessions to observe and support my child?
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Parents are welcome to observe sessions. We believe in a collaborative approach to education.

How do I measure the progress my child is making with online tutoring?
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We provide regular progress reports and assessments to track your child’s academic development.

What happens if my child isn't clicking with their assigned tutor? Can we request a change?
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Yes, we prioritise the student-tutor relationship and can arrange a change if the need arises.

Are there any additional resources or tools available to support students learning maths, besides tutoring sessions?
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Yes, we offer a range of resources and materials, including interactive exercises and practice worksheets.

Help find online resources

Although quadratics isn’t your forte, online research seems to be (evidenced by the fact that you found this article).

Luckily for you (and your child), we live in an age where an incredible array of resources to assist your child with their learning can be easily accessed online. For many students, the time investment required to find suitable online resources is a large enough barrier to prevent them from benefitting. This is where you come in.

If you are able to distil this search to resources specific to a particular skill or question type, you will be able to source fantastic materials to support their learning. You will be amazed by the results that a search of “quadratic equations using the split method” can yield.

Another tip: for each topic or concept, search for various resources of different types that can be used to support your child’s learning in different ways. For example, first seek out a written explanation, followed by a YouTube video and a practice worksheet.

Contextualise the learning

Bodies of academic research have found that when a student understands why they are learning new information, they see a noticeable uplift in motivation and knowledge retention.

As a parent who understands the broader benefits of education and the potential applications of new knowledge, it can be your role to communicate this why. There are two different approaches we recommend to help achieve this contextualisation:

1. Explain the opportunities that certain knowledge can unlock

Explain to your child the profound influence that the knowledge of a particular subject can have in their lives, whether they want to be an astronaut (do that maths homework!), a sports commentator (pay attention in English class!) or find the cure for cancer (listen to the chemistry teacher!).

2. Find applications of the specific knowledge being learnt (this may involve independent research)

Almost everything that your child learns at school has a real-world context, even if at first it is hard to determine (looking at you, algebra!). Once your child can relate their subject-matter to a real-world situation, the perceived benefits of learning become more tangible, and increases in motivation will naturally follow.

Break down misunderstanding into modular blocks

There are very few things that are more counterproductive for students’ knowledge development than becoming overwhelmed by the amount of information they are required to learn.

If you start to sense that your child is feeling overrun by their misunderstanding, and is disconnecting from their homework as a result, this is an important moment during which to intervene as a parent.

Why? Because your external perspective can help you break down what might appear to be an overwhelming task into smaller, more manageable, content blocks. Do not let your child conclude that they “can’t do calculus”; instead, explain to them that they are simply missing a discrete set of skills.

These missing skills can then be addressed one-by-one inform an ordered learning program to build capability in an optimal fashion.

For many students, the time investment required to find suitable online resources is a large enough barrier to prevent them from benefitting. This is where you come in.

For many students, the time investment required to find suitable online resources is a large enough barrier to prevent them from benefitting. This is where you come in.

If your child is struggling with their maths homework, this may be a result of gaps in their foundational knowledge.

Consider exploring the Tutero Maths learning platform to see if our intelligent diagnostic-based learning programs can help them find and fill their knowledge gaps in maths.

Thanks for reading! Check out some of our other blog posts for more tips on how to help your child learn.

As a parent, you want to support your child through their education. You want to provide that shoulder to lean on and that extra pair of hands for homework tasks.

But for so many parents, there comes a tipping point when their child’s homework becomes too hard to handle… especially with maths! So, what can you do when this issue arises?

Here are three tips that do not involve pulling out a textbook for some late-night study.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

For many students, the time investment required to find suitable online resources is a large enough barrier to prevent them from benefitting. This is where you come in.

Help find online resources

Although quadratics isn’t your forte, online research seems to be (evidenced by the fact that you found this article).

Luckily for you (and your child), we live in an age where an incredible array of resources to assist your child with their learning can be easily accessed online. For many students, the time investment required to find suitable online resources is a large enough barrier to prevent them from benefitting. This is where you come in.

If you are able to distil this search to resources specific to a particular skill or question type, you will be able to source fantastic materials to support their learning. You will be amazed by the results that a search of “quadratic equations using the split method” can yield.

Another tip: for each topic or concept, search for various resources of different types that can be used to support your child’s learning in different ways. For example, first seek out a written explanation, followed by a YouTube video and a practice worksheet.

Contextualise the learning

Bodies of academic research have found that when a student understands why they are learning new information, they see a noticeable uplift in motivation and knowledge retention.

As a parent who understands the broader benefits of education and the potential applications of new knowledge, it can be your role to communicate this why. There are two different approaches we recommend to help achieve this contextualisation:

1. Explain the opportunities that certain knowledge can unlock

Explain to your child the profound influence that the knowledge of a particular subject can have in their lives, whether they want to be an astronaut (do that maths homework!), a sports commentator (pay attention in English class!) or find the cure for cancer (listen to the chemistry teacher!).

2. Find applications of the specific knowledge being learnt (this may involve independent research)

Almost everything that your child learns at school has a real-world context, even if at first it is hard to determine (looking at you, algebra!). Once your child can relate their subject-matter to a real-world situation, the perceived benefits of learning become more tangible, and increases in motivation will naturally follow.

Break down misunderstanding into modular blocks

There are very few things that are more counterproductive for students’ knowledge development than becoming overwhelmed by the amount of information they are required to learn.

If you start to sense that your child is feeling overrun by their misunderstanding, and is disconnecting from their homework as a result, this is an important moment during which to intervene as a parent.

Why? Because your external perspective can help you break down what might appear to be an overwhelming task into smaller, more manageable, content blocks. Do not let your child conclude that they “can’t do calculus”; instead, explain to them that they are simply missing a discrete set of skills.

These missing skills can then be addressed one-by-one inform an ordered learning program to build capability in an optimal fashion.

Thanks for reading! Check out some of our other blog posts for more tips on how to help your child learn.

As a parent, you want to support your child through their education. You want to provide that shoulder to lean on and that extra pair of hands for homework tasks.

But for so many parents, there comes a tipping point when their child’s homework becomes too hard to handle… especially with maths! So, what can you do when this issue arises?

Here are three tips that do not involve pulling out a textbook for some late-night study.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

For many students, the time investment required to find suitable online resources is a large enough barrier to prevent them from benefitting. This is where you come in.

Help find online resources

Although quadratics isn’t your forte, online research seems to be (evidenced by the fact that you found this article).

Luckily for you (and your child), we live in an age where an incredible array of resources to assist your child with their learning can be easily accessed online. For many students, the time investment required to find suitable online resources is a large enough barrier to prevent them from benefitting. This is where you come in.

If you are able to distil this search to resources specific to a particular skill or question type, you will be able to source fantastic materials to support their learning. You will be amazed by the results that a search of “quadratic equations using the split method” can yield.

Another tip: for each topic or concept, search for various resources of different types that can be used to support your child’s learning in different ways. For example, first seek out a written explanation, followed by a YouTube video and a practice worksheet.

Contextualise the learning

Bodies of academic research have found that when a student understands why they are learning new information, they see a noticeable uplift in motivation and knowledge retention.

As a parent who understands the broader benefits of education and the potential applications of new knowledge, it can be your role to communicate this why. There are two different approaches we recommend to help achieve this contextualisation:

1. Explain the opportunities that certain knowledge can unlock

Explain to your child the profound influence that the knowledge of a particular subject can have in their lives, whether they want to be an astronaut (do that maths homework!), a sports commentator (pay attention in English class!) or find the cure for cancer (listen to the chemistry teacher!).

2. Find applications of the specific knowledge being learnt (this may involve independent research)

Almost everything that your child learns at school has a real-world context, even if at first it is hard to determine (looking at you, algebra!). Once your child can relate their subject-matter to a real-world situation, the perceived benefits of learning become more tangible, and increases in motivation will naturally follow.

Break down misunderstanding into modular blocks

There are very few things that are more counterproductive for students’ knowledge development than becoming overwhelmed by the amount of information they are required to learn.

If you start to sense that your child is feeling overrun by their misunderstanding, and is disconnecting from their homework as a result, this is an important moment during which to intervene as a parent.

Why? Because your external perspective can help you break down what might appear to be an overwhelming task into smaller, more manageable, content blocks. Do not let your child conclude that they “can’t do calculus”; instead, explain to them that they are simply missing a discrete set of skills.

These missing skills can then be addressed one-by-one inform an ordered learning program to build capability in an optimal fashion.

Thanks for reading! Check out some of our other blog posts for more tips on how to help your child learn.

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